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 »  Home  »  Usability Page 2  »  Access System Volume Information Folders
Access System Volume Information Folders
By  Super Admin  | Published  02/23/2005 | Usability Page 2 | Rating:
Access System Volume Information Folders

In order to gain access, follow the directions below depending on your version of XP and File System:

 


Windows XP Professional or Windows XP Home Edition Using the FAT32 File System

Click Start , and then click My Computer

On the Tools menu, click Folder Options

On the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders

Clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box

Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the change

Click OK 

Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it


Windows XP Professional Using the NTFS File System on a Domain

Click Start , and then click My Computer

On the Tools menu, click Folder Options         

On the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders 

Clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box

Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the change

Click OK

Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder, and then click Sharing and Security 

Click the Security tab

Click Add , and then type the name of the user to whom you want to give access to the folder. Choose the account location if appropriate (either local or from the domain). Typically, this is the account with which you are logged on. Click OK , and then click OK 

Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it


Windows XP Professional using the NTFS File System on a Workgroup

Click Start , and then click My Computer 

On the Tools menu, click Folder Options 

On the View tab, click Show hidden files and folders

Clear the Hide protected operating system files (Recommended) check box. Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the change

Clear the Use simple file sharing (Recommended) check box

Click OK 

Right-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder, and then click Sharing and Security 

Click the Security tab

Click Add , and then type the name of the user to whom you want to give access to the folder. Typically, this is the account with which you are logged on. Click OK , and then click OK

Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it


Windows XP Home Edition Using the NTFS File System

In Windows XP Home Edition with the NTFS file system, you must use the Cacls tool, which is a command-line tool to display or modify file or folder access control lists (ACLs)

Click Start , click Run , type cmd , and then click OK 

Make sure that you are in the root folder of the partition for which you want to gain access to the System Volume Information folder. For example, to gain access the the C:\System Volume Information folder, make sure that you are in the root folder of drive C (at a "C:\" prompt). To get to the root of any partition, make sure you are in that partition and then type "cd\" (without the quotation marks).

Type the following line, and then press ENTER:

cacls " driveletter :\System Volume Information" /E /G username :F

Make sure to type the quotation marks as indicated. Also, if your user name contains a space you'll need to put your username in quotes. This command adds the specified user to the folder with Full Control permissions

Double-click the System Volume Information folder in the root folder to open it

If you need to remove the permissions after troubleshooting, type the following line at a command prompt:

cacls " driveletter :\System Volume Information" /E /R username

This command removes all permissions for the specified user.

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Comments
  • Comment #1 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    excelent advice, not what i was looking for but still good :)
     
  • Comment #2 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    well i have no idea before that this bullshit has to be done. well i be really greatfull and thankfull to this site
     
  • Comment #3 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    This article only duplicates information published on dozens of other web pages, on top of that the procedure is evident anyway. But it doesn't tell how to stop Windows from creating these "System Volume Information" folders altogether. You're dealing with symptoms, not reasons.
     
  • Comment #4 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    I want to stop Windows creating this nonsense, and once created, I want to delete it without creating havoc in the system (i.e. if I just erase it, Windows will look for it). No help here.
     
  • Comment #5 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    This works in safe mode but when xp is rebooted the System Volume Information files are replaced on all 7 of my Partitions
     
  • Comment #6 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    It's amazing how some people trash good advice because they are too ignorant to understand it. Your cacls command-line won't work as written. There should be no space between 'driveletter' and ':Sys...' (e.g. C:Sys...) or 'username' and ':F' (e.g. username:F). Once those typos are corrected, it works perfectly and did exactly what I needed. Thank you very much. Keep up the good work.
     
  • Comment #7 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    according to my pc the argument is invallid
     
  • Comment #8 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Excellent advice its working!!
     
  • Comment #9 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    this doesnt work!!! i want to delete this shit folder, is there any other way???
     
  • Comment #10 (Posted by igor)
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    and what if i'm using Win 200 sp4 Pro?, i just can't remove that folder, and it contains aprox. 1.5Gb of all of kind of unusefull files. HELP!
     
  • Comment #11 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    i couldnt get anything
     
  • Comment #12 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    It's the old copy & paste from Microsoft.com trick. Man, I've gotta get me a website and start doing this. Then I can add some shady pop-up ads, and I'll be all squared away.
     
  • Comment #13 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Enabled me to delete a backdoor trojan virus out of system volume information folder manually as my AV couldn't get in. Thank you very much!
     
  • Comment #14 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Tried. Worked perfectly (XP Home using NTFS on Drive with SysVolInfo (D:})
     
  • Comment #15 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Thanks a lot for this. After my AV recently detected a trojan in System Volume Information, I researched the purpose of this folder a little more. For those who don't know System Volume Information is a folder containing the backups for the System Restore utility. To stop windows from creating these goto: Control Panel->System->System Restore and check the box that says "Turn off System Restore on all drives." Then go through all the drives/partitions and delete these folders. System Restore is completely unnecessary and a waste of disk space for anyone who has a good system for backups.
     
  • Comment #16 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    CACLS ? great tool, thanks :)
     
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