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 »  Home  »  System Performance Page 1  »  Unload .dll's to Free Memory
Unload .dll's to Free Memory
By  Super Admin  | Published  02/24/2005 | System Performance Page 1 | Unrated
Unload .dll's to Free Memory

1. Find the key [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer].
2. Create a new sub-key named 'AlwaysUnloadDLL' and set the default value to equal '1' to disable Windows caching the DLL in memory.
3. Restart Windows for the change to take effect.

I tried this after running a intense program, then watched the task manager; memory recovered it self.

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Comments
  • Comment #1 (Posted by Crest)
    Rating
    I noticed an excellant increase. This actually give you more ram too. Say your nunning a program and it takes up 256 megs of ram. When you are done and close it, you will get back a little more than 256 and your pc will perform better.
     
  • Comment #2 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    This was configured by default at my computer
     
  • Comment #3 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    Want to unload NOW. like c:unload.exe xxx.dll
     
  • Comment #4 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    Useful thing. I use Warecase eXtended Task Manager to unload dll but this idea could work as well.
     
  • Comment #5 (Posted by Greg)
    Rating
    Good Idea. I use Warecase eXtended Task Manager to unload dlls but this could work as well.
     
  • Comment #6 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    HKLMSOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionExplorer] "AlwaysUnloadDLL" Myth - "Enabling AlwaysUnloadDLL frees up more memory and improves performance." Reality - "Adding this Registry Key in Windows 2000 or XP has no effect since this registry key is no longer supported in Microsoft Windows 2000 or later. The Shell automatically unloads a DLL when its usage count is zero, but only after the DLL has not been used for a period of time. This inactive period might be unacceptably long at times, especially when a Shell extension DLL is being debugged. For operating systems prior to Windows 2000, you can shorten the inactive period by adding this registry key."
     
  • Comment #7 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    Top tweak
     
  • Comment #8 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    How can you try this and watch the task manager recover??? Step 3 is a reboot!
     
  • Comment #9 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    only works on win 2000 and lower.
     
  • Comment #10 (Posted by TL Harris)
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    Honest attempt, but you can't create a "subkey" without first creating a folder in which to create it, so with these instructions, trouble ahead. Get a disk imaging utility before this one! The tweak wouldn't work on any Win Op Sys after '98 any ways. Whew.
     
  • Comment #11 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    You can't create a "subkey" directly in the explorer folder. That's why they call it a "subkey". These instructions insufficient and will get people in trouble. This tweak (dweeb) will not work on any Win Op Sys after 1998 any ways. If your system is that old, then I guess you'd have to resort to trying things like this. Get yourself a good disk imaging program first.
     
  • Comment #12 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    THIS TIP WILL IMPAIR PERFORMANCE. Windows does not immediately unload DLL's for performance reasons. Windows is fully capable of unloading DLL's when necessary, but until this happens there is no need to do so. Unused memory is wasted memory. Windows designers know more about memory management then you do. Microsoft documents that this setting is not available on Windows 2000 and later. http://home.comcast.net/~SupportCD/XPMyths.html This setting was intended to aid software developers, not to improve performance. Larry Miller
     
  • Comment #13 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    Commonly known.
     
  • Comment #14 (Posted by an unknown user)
    Rating
    configured by default
     
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