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 »  Home  »  Software  »  Run defrag from the command line
Run defrag from the command line
By  Super Admin  | Published  02/25/2005 | Software | Rating:
Run defrag from the command line
Open a command window and type defrag /? to show a list of commands.
Exampel:
defrag c: /analyce will show how much your disk is fragmented.
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Comments
  • Comment #1 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Duh. What lousy advice.
     
  • Comment #2 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    What a waste of bloody time. Aussie Dave
     
  • Comment #3 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    You need to show the working directory %SystemRoot%System32, Run defrag.exe Command Line Parameters and Explanations Usage defrag volume [-a] [-f][-v] [-?] Parameters volume The drive letter or a mount point of the volume to be defragmented -a Analyze only -f Forces defragmentation of the volume regardless of whether it needs to be defragmented or even if free space is low -v Verbose output -? Display the help text
     
  • Comment #4 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    has anyone sent this to WTF?
     
  • Comment #5 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    WOW... What a waste of time... What I think the author meant to say was defrag [-a] [-f] [-v] [-?] volume drive letter or mount point (d: or d:volmountpoint) -a Analyze only -f Force defragmentation even if free space is low -v Verbose output -? Display this help text
     
  • Comment #6 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    useless
     
  • Comment #7 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    wow this is a horrible waste of internet electrons.
     
  • Comment #8 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    all this chatter and i'm none the wiser... pff..
     
  • Comment #9 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    LOL, I explained defrag in much more detail for my online class I'm taking. Here's what I wrote: The second DOS command I still use in Windows XP today is DEFRAG, since Windows XP doesn’t have an easy way to schedule Disk Defragmenter to automatically run on a weekly basis the way Windows Vista and Windows 7 can. For anyone who’s not familiar with Disk Defragmenter, it simply reorganizes your files on your hard drive so that Windows can load them quicker instead of being scattered all over the place. Windows and your other software programs run much more smoothly if your hard drive have been defragmented. So, I have a Scheduled Task that runs the DOS version of Disk Defragmenter automatically on a weekly basis in Windows XP. It’s simply DEFRAG (insert drive letter here). So, to run Disk Defragment all of my hard drives, I created a batch file with these DOS commands (without the step numbers, of course): Step #1: DEFRAG C: -f -v Step #2: DEFRAG D: -f -v Step #3: DEFRAG E: -f -v As with my backup batch file above, DEFRAG will defragment hard drive C first, and once that finishes, it’ll DEFRAG hard drive D, and so forth. The “-f” and “-v” aren’t necessary to use, except that the “-f” tells Windows to run DEFRAG even if there isn’t a lot of room left on the hard drive to move files around to reorganize them, but if the hard drive is almost full, this can make DEFRAG run a lot slower! The “-v” means “verbose”, in which we’ve already discussed in class. It gives me more detailed information on the display (or on the screen) of what Disk Defragmenter is currently doing. Not important, but the information may be useful. I haven’t found much use for the other parameters you can use, but you can find out more by typing “DEFRAG -?” at the DOS prompt (command line).
     
  • Comment #10 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Maybe F7 your text in Word before and copy it over. /? is a generic switch for most command line tools.......
     
  • Comment #11 (Posted by Jake Temperton)
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    This could be lamer, but it would have to be read in a prone position...pathetic. No attributes, no nothing. Quit wasting electrons...doesn't that contribute to global warming or maybe cooling, at least in your office?
     
  • Comment #12 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    should be obvious
     
  • Comment #13 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    at the very least the author could have run a spell check!
     
  • Comment #14 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    You guys are such ungrateful. Why do you come here? Obviously for answers on defrag which was given, but you are just not satisfied. If not, shut the F%&k up and go somewhere instead of leaving unproductive messages on the FREE forum. Talking about wasting electrons…. Ohh and by the way. For those complaining about the spelling. This forum is open to the world public, have you ever considered that the person posting the message may not be of English speaking background.
     
  • Comment #15 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    waste of space
     
  • Comment #16 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    now I stay in touch..
     
  • Comment #17 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    %windir%system32dfrg.msc
     
  • Comment #18 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    Learn how to spell. Clearly you need some help with the command line. Thank god you don't use Linux.
     
  • Comment #19 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    You have got to be kidding.
     
  • Comment #20 (Posted by kabelo)
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    it works thax
     
  • Comment #21 (Posted by an unknown user)
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    i found it very funny ;-) (and a bit sad for the author)
     
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